Punditry in football is now problematic for Premier League consumers

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A list of names on a graphic flashes up to a screen with the floral bounce of green off black and white in the St. James’ Park background. The Southampton team lists eleven players, eyes are drawn to Takumi Minamino. You have an idea where he will fit, everything else is, usually, complimentary hand-holding through the formalities in audio form.

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The fundamental essence of football commentary is that it serves to enhance the spectacle for the viewer. At its best, it should combine descriptive, emotive and informative elements, all of which creates a sense of occasion when watching through a screen — whether that be in a fully-packed pub (back in the pre-pandemic world when such things existed), in your living room, on your smartphone or whichever environment in which you habitually watch football aside from in the stadium itself.

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Has there been a more disappointing foray into modern broadcasting than Amazon Prime’s Premier League property?

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The endpoint to all this feels inevitable. Fans now live in their own self-created ecosystems. You, dear reader, are reading this on a website that covers Liverpool and the wider sporting culture. Everything this site covers is viewed through those Liverpool-centric eyes; not Newcastle or Nepal or Napoli.

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Senior Football Analyst at Cox Media’s sports vertical’s: All-22 (NFL) and SEC Country.

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